The Use Of The Eu`s Free Trade Agreements

One study showed that trade agreements implemented by the EU between 1993 and 2013 «reduced adjusted prices by almost 7%.» [83] The issue of free trade negotiations is increasingly at the centre of the trade agenda. It is therefore increasingly important to base negotiating proposals and policy decisions on empirical data and objective facts. This report, prepared in collaboration between the National Trade Council and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), is a first attempt to analyse the use of tariff preferences in free trade agreements between the two parties, from both the exporter`s and the importer`s point of view. The observations and results are based on the EU`s free trade agreements with a number of developed and developing countries. The EU is one of the world`s leading negotiators of free trade agreements and one of the few free trade parties for which data on preferential use are more or less publicly available. However, the results may be relevant to all existing and negotiated free trade agreements. The report complements these relatively intuitive observations with fairly abundant data and case studies. For example, agricultural trade between the EU and Mexico has continued to grow throughout the period of the free trade agreement, but outside the high-end market, for example, French wine exporters have failed to gain market share. This is explained by bilateral factors – the common language and the historical and cultural relations with Spain, Chile and Argentina more closely orient marketing and preferences towards the Mexican consumer. The other is access to distribution channels. French exporters are relatively small and fragmented compared to, for example, large Australian exporters, so they have not been able to market and market as effectively in Mexico.

The EU recently published a detailed report on «the impact of EU trade agreements on the agricultural sector». According to the Commission, the document is published in the context of rising protectionism within the EU and its main trading partners. The report, along with a detailed review of some of the EU`s major free trade agreements (FTAs), aim to support the debate on the pros and cons of trade liberalisation. The EU has concluded trade agreements with these countries/regions, but both sides are negotiating an update. The preface (other languages), published in November 2020 by Sabine Weyand, Director-General of DG Trade, provides an overview of the successes achieved in 2019 and the ongoing work for the EU`s 36 main preferential trade agreements. The working document attached by the Commission services contains detailed information under the trade and partner agreements. . . .